Julia Martin Moves Discussion to Larger Space to Accommodate All + Thoughts on Art Criticism

Lots of great news here. Julia Martin has planned a panel discussion for Friday, as I wrote about last week. Martin wrote to her mailing list yesterday:

What was initially planned as an intimate open forum discussion, with members of our local arts community coming together to discuss the How’s and Why’s behind the removal of a painting by a prominent local artist from a prominent local business, has taken on a life of its own. And rightly so considering the current social climate.

She announced today that the talk will be held at White Avenue Studio: 2517 White Ave, Nashville, Tennessee 37204 at 5:30 pm. 

Also, Martin has asked Stephanie Pruitt to moderate the discussion. Stephanie is an established poet and artist from Nashville. She is also an advocate for artists and a public speaker, and she’s been helping Nashville artists learn how to be self-sustaining with their work.

Martin has sought out a larger venue to accommodate all who would like to gather and discuss racially charged imagery in art. In my opinion, Martin is acting as a leader in our artistic community. It takes courage to pull off something like this, as well as to take criticism as well as she has. Hope to see some of you there.

I think this opens up a different debate that I’d like to engage as well (later on.) We have some wonderful arts writers in this town. Laura Hutson’s art reviews in the Scene get better and deeper every week. Sara Estes is bringing serious art criticism to the Tennessean and providing her crazy art knowledge in her column over at BURNAWAY. Joe Nolan is a tireless foot soldier who helps us all connect more with the art around us. Megan Kelley’s insights have shaken me to my core. Tony Youngblood’s column in Nashville Arts shines light on arts organizations and initiatives that would otherwise not be in the public eye. There are others, too.

Some people have pointed out that it’s not the role of the art critic to discuss social issues like these. If we believe art is necessary to experiencing the full range of human emotion, that artists should seek to further their skills and conceptual basis, and that an arts community includes dialogue about the art itself, then arts writers should feel a calling to comment on social issues. When we begin perceiving art in a vacuum, we miss the point. Or rather, there is no point. Without the human experience, we have nothing to say. It’s the lived experiences of human beings that contextualizes art objects and makes us feel, when looking at a painting by Sheila B. or Khalo or de Kooning, that there is a greater story to tell than our own, that we exist in a continuum of voices, and that we are not alone. I will continue asking questions of myself and others that enrich my human experience and create a more just and equitable city, and I ask my colleagues to continue doing the same. We are producing good work in Nashville. Let’s keep at it and be even better.

Advertisements