Month: November 2015

Red Arrow Gallery Kickstarter Closes in 2.5 Hours

dan holland

Installation shot of Daniel Holland’s Dirty Pictures. Red Arrow Gallery, 2015.

Red Arrow Gallery has shown exciting work at its Riverside Village location over the past year since it relocated from Joshua Tree, California to Nashville. The property they rented in East Nashville was sold recently, and they’ve got a new home at 919 Gallatin Avenue. But, the space needs a lot of work to outfit it as a gallery. Today is the last day of their Kickstarter to raise the reasonable amount of $10,000 in this effort. It ends at 5:00 p.m.

Red Arrow has worked with kids at Maplewood High School and Isaac Litton Middle, and its staff says they want the gallery to be approachable to people who have never stepped foot in one before. I hope they’ll continue their community outreach arm in their new location, because the arts are too often complicit in gentrification. They also do a great artist talk series hosted by Joe Nolan. I love artist talks and will definitely make more of them in the coming year.

In the meantime, OZ is hosting them until the end of the year.

They hope to re-open at the new spot in January. Give here if you’re able.

A Morning Talk with Vadis Turner

Vadis Turner. "Daybreak."

Vadis Turner. “Daybreak.”

Saturday morning, Vadis Turner will give a talk at David Lusk Gallery. Turner’s exhibition “Time of Day” has been showing at DLG and this will be your last chance to see it. Turner’s work is as thoughtful and it is beautiful. It’s also decidedly feminist; Turner explores traditional women’s work with textiles and asks viewers to consider how value labor. I got to write some words about “Time of Day” for Nashville Scene. Read it here.

Where: David Lusk Gallery, 516 Hagan Street

When: Saturday, November 14; 11:30 a.m.

Bonus: Next to Dozen Bakery. Yum.

Modular Art Pods: Open Call for Submissions Closing in Fast

From the pod of Adrienne Newman.

From the pod of Adrienne Newman.

Remember last February’s Modular Art Pods show that took place at Abrasive Media and was created by my then-boyfriend-now-husband Tony Youngblood? The Nashville Scene called it the year’s best pop-up installation, and it’s returning next year and will be bigger and better! The show will be at OZ Arts from June 21-24, 2016, and the call for submissions is closing in fast on November 18, 2015. That’s Wednesday, people!

From the pod of Molly Lahym and Dylan Elhier.

From the pod of Molly Lahym and Dylan Elhier.

The MAPs website has everything you need to know about building a pod. This time around, there will also be pre-built performance pods that will add a new dimension to the deal. Here’s my photo gallery and Stephen Trageser’s video from February to inspire you.  The application is pretty basic and he’ll definitely work with you if your project grows legs and evolves between now and then.

Apply here! Good luck!

Last Day to Donate to Locate Arts

tennessee logoQuick post. Locate Arts, which I told you about back in March, is on its final day of a Kickstarter that would support its first year of operations costs. This is your last chance, and yes, they have to meet their goal to get even one red cent that’s been pledged.

If you’ve ever said the following, you owe it to yourself to donate.

  1. “Nashville doesn’t support the arts.”
  2. “There isn’t enough critical writing about art in Nashville.”
  3. “I wish I knew what was happening in Knoxville, or Memphis, or Chattanooga, or any little arts enclave in Tennessee.”
  4. “Not enough people buy art in Nashville. How can I make a living?”
  5. “Screw this. I’m going to New York/L.A. where I can see “cutting edge” contemporary art.”

As far as I can tell, you don’t get to complain about Nashville’s art scene if you don’t give to this campaign. Here’s how Locate Arts will help you personally.

  1. If you’re an artist: Locate Arts will have a statewide artist registry with links to your website or gallery. It will be user-friendly, beautiful, and connect you to people within and outside of Tennessee. It will also list all contemporary art exhibitions in the whole damn state. Your practice will be more sustainable because see number 2.
  2. If you are an arts patron: Whether you have the money to purchase art or not, making us art outward facing will bring more artists to Tennessee. It will promote contemporary art in Tennessee to the rest of the country (and beyond!) so that art buyers will put us on their map. More artists will make their home in our cities. Our creative economies will pick up. That means more art events for those of us (ME!) who can’t afford to buy art much.
  3. Umm…if they get off to a good start financially, Locate Arts can start thinking about a Tennessee biennial, which let’s admit would be fucking great.
  4. If you are a gallery owner or curator: See 1-3.

Finally, we will harness the energy of our art scenes across the state, creating more collaborations, more support, more cross-pollination in writing, event-planning, and contact. Here are some things I wrote after I visited Memphis for 24 hours. There’s so much to see and do. Locate Arts will open doors, and behind these doors, we’ll find enrichment and happiness.

If you don’t want to listen to me, listen to Lain York, lifelong Nashvillian, artist, and curator of Zeitgeist: “More communication between the studio communities is crucial and directly affects regional museums, academic programs, state and city arts commissions, commercial galleries, and independent artist-run initiatives. Conduits like these industry hubs will have a more articulate sense of what artists are doing to pass along to supporting constituencies. The initial conversations of LOCATE Arts are already giving contemporary art a higher profile in Tennessee.”

So donate to the Kickstarter today! Even $10 bucks helps. And if have more to spend, you can get artwork from local geniuses like Jodi Hays, Karen Seapker, Shana Kohnstamm, and more from around Tennessee.

War and Rumors of War at Seed Space

warandrumors1

One of my favorite exhibitions this year is currently on view at Seed Space, and the artist, Eric Dickson, will be present on Saturday night. I wrote some words about the exhibition for BURNAWAY, and I hope you’ll check out Dickson’s work! From my review:

War and Rumors of War is required viewing for anyone concerned about the policies that govern us, the wars fought in our names, and the ways we make sense of our present circumstances. Most of all, it helps to clarify what we should pay attention to and what we should ignore, for it challenges our political agency with advanced technological art-making that manages to somehow remain subtle and restrained.

Seed Space is located in the Track One building. Dickson will be there from 6-9 p.m. Saturday.