Ben Patterson

Sweet Micky for President: Pop Star Rises to Presidency

  1. My first NaFF pick of the season was Sweet Micky for President, Ben Patterson and Pras Michel’s documentary on the Haitian presidential election in 2011 and pop star candidate Michel Martelly who won by a landslide. It’s a gripping story of a struggling democracy and a people that just won’t quit. Patterson and Pras attended.

    Although Haiti was the first Caribbean independent state, the only nation formed as the result of a slave riot, and the second independent nation in the Americas (second only to the United States), it has only democratically elected leaders three times. Since it’s 1804 independence, it’s pretty much been marred by political unrest. The film is framed from Pras’ point of view; ten months after the earthquake, he went to Haiti and saw very little progress.

    Pras looked around and saw only more corruption. He wanted more for the Haitian people, someone they could believe in and who would be vested in their interests alone. It’s in this context that the most unlikely candidate gained the confidence of the people, pop star Sweet Micky, who had spent a career singing about political corruption and sometimes pulling down his pants. Pras approached Martelly with this crazy idea. Soon after, he approached Patterson to tell the story.

    The result is a beautifully shot film with a tight narrative. Martelly seems the most unlikely candidate: he has no political experience, presents no plans on his platform, and knows no campaign strategy. But he wins the confidence of the country’s youth. He’s handsome, likable, and passionate. Martelly’s candidacy is quickly challenged by Pras’ former band member Wyclef Jean, who campaigns in Haiti despite the fact that he is not a resident (because of this, his candidacy is eventually denied.) Although Wyclef in the end endorses and campaigns with Martelly, he doesn’t come across well the film. He appears just short of megalomaniacal, riding only on his celebrity. Where Pras and Martelly are crusaders for democracy, Jean’s motivation is murky. But politics can bring out the worst in people, and while I’m overall a bigger fan of Pras, I wondered how the story could be told differently from Wyclef’s perspective.

    The narrative moves fast with many intimate moments among Pras and Martelly and Wyclef and, of course, a killer soundtrack that had 90s kids bopping in their seats. It also shows the Haitian people in many contexts: yes, in the wake of the earthquake, yes during violent military coups, but also singing and dancing and living and working together across the culturally rich and varied land. As Pras said after the show, of the over 10 million Haitians, 65% are under 25 years old. Through what must have been endless footage shot on his Canon C100, Patterson culls many moments showing Haitian youths to be passionately involved in their political future.

    Here’s the thing: the film is tightly controlled to present Martelly as a golden child of Haiti. People are crazed with love for him, and watching them rally their support after the general election votes were counted was inspiring. Voting always makes me choked up, and watching young men and women whose lives have been ravaged by political corruption and natural disaster cast their ballots for someone they believed in was in fact riveting. Martelly inspired hope. He showed us that the people of Haiti and the youth in particular have not given up. They will inherit the earth.

    Martelly won, beating out Mirlande Manigat, who has 25 years in Haitian politics. The film suggested that Manigat would have continued covering up the previous party’s corruption, thus implying that she would continue it. I would not be surprised if that’s true. But Martelly himself was accused of corruption in 2011. He is now essentially running the country without a Parliament — no checks and balances — and surrounded by advisers and friends accused of various heinous crimes. Pras himself admitted after the screening that Martelly could have done better. To see Pras back peddling on the man he so fervently believed in proved his chops for me — he doesn’t conform his opinions to a vision he had before — but I wished that the film also rose to the occasion to fess up. Because the documentary ends with Martelly’s election, it copped out. I think that the people who elected Martelly deserve better. He’s has been a disappointment. It’s hard to get real poll numbers on public approval, but Martelly’s into the last leg of his term, and many still call for his resignation.

    My thoughts as I headed home were with the Haitian democracy, because even though Martelly lived up to all of his opponents’ pronouncements, he was put in office by people who finally felt like they had a voice.

    Sweet Micky for President is showing again Sunday at 3:45. 

    Up next: The Keepers, Margarita with a Straw, Runoff

    Read three reviews I wrote in Nashville Scene’s guide to NaFF. Naz & Maalik (see it!), For the Plasma (skip it!), and Yosemite (go! and I promise there’s only a little James Franco).

Advertisements