Centennial Park

Art in the Park Continues

Last week we told you about Yoga for Truckers (+Everyone). At 2:30-3:30 pm, Tuesday, Nov. 4th, you can join Nicole Cormaci and Amanda Wentworth to practice yoga in the treasury room of the Parthenon.  All yoga will be conducted in chairs as part of Cormaci’s FLEX IT! goal to design a series of yoga moves for truckers and other sedentary workers. Cormaci’s Yoga for Truckers and other Sedentary Workers participatory work will result in a podcast.

We also told you about a game of Capture the Flag that went down at the Parthenon in October. Don’t miss the next events: 2-3 pm, Saturday, Nov. 8th and 22nd, MeetUp with Adrienne Outlaw for introductory zumba and capoeira classes in Centennial Park. The classes will be taught by instructors with the  Global Education Center. Weather permitting, they will be held in the park on the south lawn. Should they be held in the Parthenon museum admission applies.

Here I am guarding the jail during MeetUp's Capture the Flag. Photo  courtesy of Adrienne Outlaw.

Here I am guarding the jail during MeetUp’s Capture the Flag. Photo courtesy of Adrienne Outlaw.

The classes are part of Outlaw’s MeetUp project for FLEX IT! MeetUp events, designed to encourage acts of health and harmony, have included a potluck picnic, mud making and Capture the Flag. Future events include bread making and massage, portions of which are being shown as part of Outlaw’s evolving video installation in the museum.

Yoga for Truckers (+Everyone) at the Parthenon

FLEX_Cormaci1We don’t think about it much, but the goods we use have been transported great distances by machines operated by people — the screen that meets your focus, the coffee in your cup, the gasoline in your car. When performance artist Nicole Cormaci found herself traveling from British Columbia to Indiana regularly, she became empathetic to the physical effects of the long haul, spurring her social practice work Yoga for Truckers (+Everyone).

The work debuted in September at the Parthenon Museum as part of FLEX IT! My Body My Temple, an evolving social practice work curated by Adrienne Outlaw that addresses all matters of personal upkeep: physical, emotional, and spiritual, and invites participants to consider the social ramifications when we take personal responsibility. Cormaci’s piece offers a new element to the mix, applying the ancient, specific knowledge of yoga practitioners to the sedentary practice of operating trains, planes, and automobiles. It’s not just for transportation folks though. In our screen-based world, many of us find ourselves sitting for long stretches, only to find our bodies cramped and knees aching long after we unwind. For truckers, the damage is lasting: hip, back, and knee issues can permanently damage posture, making mobility difficult and painful. Yoga for Truckers investigates whether yoga can correct some of the damage that’s been done.

When the work debuted in September, local yoga instructor Amanda Wentworth led trucker Lonnie Keller in a sequence of yoga poses that can be practiced while driving. They’ll continue that work this week — in the cab of a tractor trailer in Centennial Park. Wentworth will lead a free community yoga class that builds on these sequences on Tuesday, Nov. 4, 1:30-2:30.

Much of Cormaci’s work is site specific, and Centennial Park is an interesting place for a work that revolves around transportation, considering that it was largely financed by railroad companies in celebration the 100 year anniversary of Tennessee’s ratification into the Union. The train is the predecessor of the trucking industry, and Cormaci’s work as whole asks us to consider the people who move things across the country, while we reflect on our own postures as we move through the world.

Outlaw’s MeetUp Makes Players Consider What Moves Us

“It’s behind the tree!” the the boy yelled. “It’s right there!” He and his brother were in jail again, and their mom was busy guarding their flag on the other side. But they wouldn’t be there for long. A woman sprinted across enemy lines, tagging them free, and the trio jogged back to their territory, their arms stretched high in triumph.

FLEX-AO-JuneOn a Sunday in October, artist Adrienne Outlaw organized a game of Capture the Flag that allowed children to be models of wellness. Capture the Flag requires team members to communicate and strategize and rewards different levels of athleticism and skill. Players found themselves conversing more with the people they didn’t know than those they did, and adults relied on the speed and gall of children to race to the opponent’s side and capture the flag, their pursuit of fun guiding them every step of the way. The game quickly became an exercise in community bonding as much as physical resilience, and players enjoyed an emotional and spiritual workout to boot.

The game was the latest in Outlaw’s social practice work MeetUp, which invites us to consider the ways we exercise health and harmony with each other. At the core of the piece is the concept that individual responsibility can cause a sea change. A subtle shift in our lifestyle choices–honoring ourselves and bodies, valuing the food that we eat, and celebrating movement–can effect change around us, rippling out to transform our society at large.

MeetUp events have participants considering what we hunger for and why we move. We eat for sustenance and to commune with those we love. Sometimes, we eat to feed something that food alone will not satisfy. We engage in fitness practices to live longer, to look better, to socialize. We exercise to feel good, to beat back stress and keep emotional exhaustion at bay. Sometimes, we exercise to gain entry into an exclusive club of fit people. The deluge of media attention on fitness and the emotional gymnastics of well being are enough to cloud our intentions. By getting out of the gym and onto the field, MeetUp players became willing participants in a workout that left them sore but emotionally nourished.

Like all of Outlaw’s MeetUp events, Capture the Flag has an aesthetic component. The game itself was captured by photo and video and will be displayed as part of Outlaw’s video installation project, on view in the Parthenon through January. MeetUp acts as the capstone of FLEX IT! My Body My Temple, an evolving exhibition in the Parthenon Museum and on Centennial Park grounds that engages multiple artists with Nashvillians and addresses health, harmony, and wellness on a community level.

True to her oeuvre, Outlaw’s MeetUp underlines what really feeds us–communion with each other, the unity of purposeful action, and the benefits of being present for what moves us.

This Weekend: the One Mile Musical Loop and Capture the Flag at the Park

captureOn October 11-12, Centennial Park will act as a true Greek agora when FLEX IT! My Body My Temple addresses the health care crisis with socially engaged art. Nashvillians will come together and get moving with two unique events.

Saturday, social practice art collective Public Doors and Windows will stage One Mile Loop, a multi band performance around the walking trail that’s based on the habits and musical preferences of six park regulars who were interviewed by the collective earlier this year. Their music ranges from Rancid to Rodgers and Hammerstein and will be performed in varied genres, from melodic pop to heavy soul. Along the route, the collective is constructing historical markers that profile each participant. The piece invites park visitors to consider fitness in a new way that allows them to enjoy diversity of experience and intimately engage with the tastes and habits of others. Time: 3-4 p.m.

On Sunday, Adrienne Outlaw’s new installation of MeetUp will take over the park for an open-to-the public game of Capture the Flag. Players of all stripes are welcome to join this family-friendly game that requires communication and compromise, as well as different skill sets and levels of athleticism. Participants can sign up at the Kidsville tent at Musicians’ Corner, which will also hold crafting workshops throughout the afternoon. Outlaw will film the event for MeetUp’s video installation project, on view in the Parthenon. This multi-piece installation shows people in various acts of health and harmony and serves as a living document of the events in Outlaw’s social practice work. Time: 2-4 p.m.

FLEX IT! My Body My Temple gets art out of the galleries and to the people, while advocating for a subtle change in our lifestyle choices–honoring ourselves and bodies, valuing the food that we eat, and celebrating movement. The exhibition is constantly evolving as its artists visit Nashville for participatory talks and events. FLEX IT! endeavors to effect change while building on core values of reciprocity, interaction, and well being. The works are on display in the Parthenon Museum and throughout Centennial Park through January 10, 2015.

Art in the Park: Your Workout Just Got Better

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A park visitor captures coins using Bryan Leister and Becky Heavner’s app-based fitness game at FLEX IT! in Centennial Park.

Exercise just got easier thanks to artists Bryan Leister and Becky Heavner, whose interactive, app-based game Pygmalion’s Challenge has Centennial Park visitors pointing their smart phones at batches of flowers and racing up the the Parthenon steps. As part of FLEX IT! My Body My Temple, new media artist Leister and landscape architect Heavner joined forces to riff on the theme of obesity prevention, healthy living, and community. The results couldn’t be more fun and require only a smart phone to get started.

Visitors must download the free app for iPhone or Android. The goal of the game is to collect coins that allow you to unlock sculptures and watch them come to life. The artists have set sculptural markers on the Parthenon law that are now lush with flowers. Pointing a smartphone at a marker causes several gold coins to pop up on the screen. Then comes the exercise: contestants can race to the “Treasury” behind the Parthenon to cash in coins for keys. They then race back to the markers to unlock colorful, animated characters from the sculptures. The app includes an option to take a picture with the dancing sculptures and post it to social media, which the artists hope will encourage participation from kids and adults. Gold coins are apparently heavy though, so they’ll have to make several trips to unlock all of the treats.

Leister’s interactive artwork is a perfect match with Heavner’s landscape architecture. Both disciplines require an audience. “It all revolves around anticipating what people want and providing them with that experience,” Leister says. “With landscape architecture and interactive design, there is no photo opp. It’s more about the experience of people walking through the space and thinking, ‘How can I make people happy and enjoy themselves more?’”

Leister’s interactive gaming and design work includes the creation of 2000 messages to survivors of the Mayan apocalypse, an app-based mood analyticator, and videos that track viewers’ motion. He will return to Nashville on September 19-21, where he and Heavner will present a talk on their design process for Pygmalion’s Challenge (Saturday 10 a.m., location TBD). At Watkins College of Art and Design, he will facilitate two workshops: Creating 2D and 3D Content for Video Games (Thursday and Friday, 1-5 p.m., room #403) and Augmented Reality (Saturday and Sunday 1-5 p.m., room #403).

FLEX IT! My Body My Temple is a set of evolving, socially engaged art exhibits in the Parthenon Museum and on Centennial Park grounds. Curated by Adrienne Outlaw of Seed Space, FLEX IT! invites participation and reflection on personal health and fitness, while building community.

Baking Bread at the Parthenon

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Demeter’s Torch. Moira Williams and visitors of Centennial Park created this working, adobe oven. It is on wheels and can be used by visitors to bake bread on the Parthenon lawn during FLEX IT! My Body My Temple.

If you happened to be at Centennial Park during the first week of September, you may have seen artist Moira Williams walking along the loop with a wagon in tow or operating an adobe oven on the Parthenon lawn. As part of Adrienne Outlaw’s FLEX IT! My Body My Temple, the Brooklyn-based artist created an ongoing, participatory art event that invites visitors to consider what feeds us.

“When I do socially engaged work,” says Williams, “it’s always about the community and supporting the community.” The physical structure of Socrates’ Wagon Sings with Demeter’s Torch was in fact community-made. Williams worked with park visitors to construct an oven and the mini-Parthenon shaped adobe structure surrounding it. She set up a table on the Parthenon lawn and park visitors helped sketch out their ideas for the shape, the designs on the pediments, and the individual metopes. Together, they configured it to be about Athena, exercise, and eating healthy– topics that arose naturally in the course of conversation. Working with clay, they built a miniature version of Greece’s (and Nashville’s) doric masterpiece.

With the oven complete, Williams walked the mile loop with Socrates’ Wagon, collecting wild yeast and conversing with park visitors in a kind of Socratic Dialogue. “My work is always about starting a dialogue — talking and listening to people,” she said. After she harvested the yeast, she returned to the lawn and the oven and baked bread, pizza, yams, garlic, apple crumble, and dosas with park visitors. Together, they cut ties with the commercial food chain and ate food harvested from the park itself.  “When we eat together, we slow down, we think about things,” Williams says. She hopes that the experience will show participants how easy it is to step away from commercial foods.

Socrates’ Wagon Sings with Demeter’s Torch is now on display in the Parthenon Museum, and visitors can contact the artist for permission to use the oven on park grounds. She is drying Centennial Park yeast to send to FLEX IT!, and it will be available with sourdough starters for Parthenon Museum visitors. In November, she’ll return to Nashville and walk 70 miles south to The Farm, which has a legacy of teaching about community health.

Williams has made walking part of her artistic practice for many years. A founding member of The Walk Exchange, she also enjoys night walks through New York wearing various safety suits, walks pigeons over the Brooklyn Bridge, and makes trips to the post office to mail letters to the Milky Way Galaxy. When she’s not walking, she’s engaged in other participatory works, like commissioning teens to paint graffiti murals in Brooklyn, producing handmade paper from trash on the streets of Haiti, and distributing tomato seeds from 19th century Italy to community gardeners. Her work is all about reciprocity and is shared with Nashville in the spirit of relatedness.

FLEX IT! My Body My Temple is a set of evolving, socially engaged art exhibits in the Parthenon Museum and on Centennial Park grounds. Curated by Adrienne Outlaw of Seed Space, Flex It! invites participation and reflection on personal health and fitness, while building community.