WAG

Two Weekends of Art Crawling in July

This month, a tiny dream of mine is coming true: Nashville’s Downtown art crawl and its Wedgewood-Houston sister will happen on different weekends! Downtown kicks off tomorrow, Friday July 3 at 6:00. Make sure you hit COOP Gallery’s exchange exhibition with the New Orleans collective Staple Goods. The press release says that the collective functions out of what used to be a grocery store in the St. Claude Arts District, which shows how much the city has changed since I lived in there in 2005. (Arts district you say? Do tell!) I love COOP’s exchanges with other cities (you can read Laura Hutson’s article about its Nashville artists exhibiting in Brooklyn here), and I’m thrilled have some NOLA blood in the Arcade this month.

Earlier this week, I posted an interview with Briena Harmening, a textile artist and painter from right here in Tennessee. Harmening has a solo show at Blend called “I Bet You Think This Show Is About You,” and it will feature many of her crocheted paintings and sculptures. Also in the Arcade, Earbellum will have a group show including work from Ben Griffith. Ben brought us Tiny Galleries, which by the way is a great thing to do when you’re downtown (hint hint.) I was lucky to do a segment on WPLN about Ben, and working with him was tons of fun. He makes me happy.

The Arts Company opens Americana, an exhibition of LIFE Magazine photographers, including Ed Clark, Loomis Dean, Alfred Eisenstadt, John Loengard, and John Dominis, as well as sketches by artist and illustrator Ernest Hamlin Baker, as well as other gallery faves. WAG will have work from senior Casey Payne. Make sure to make your way over to Hatch Show Prints’ Haley Gallery, which will have monoprints by Master Printer Jim Sherraden. 40AU will have local printmakers Megan Kelley and Lindsy Davis.

Arts & Music @ Wedgewood/Houston will be Saturday July 11, and I’m looking forward to several show openings there.

It would sweet if everyone collectively is like, “It was so wonderful have two weekends of art. We should do it all the time!” (looking over at you, Zeitgeist and Fort Houston. ❤ <3) But I’ll take this month for now.

Bring an umbrella. xoxo

Art Crawl Weekend

There will be tons to see Saturday night, and Joe Nolan has all details in the Scene. Here’s what I’m most excited about:

Sherrick and Paul: Katy Grannan, “The Ninety-nine” and “The Nine”

Katy Grannan. Anonymous, Modesto, CA, 2012; pigment print, 40-3/4 x 31-1/4 inches (framed) or 57-3/4 x 43-3/4 inches (framed). Image courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery.

Katy Grannan. Anonymous, Modesto, CA, 2012; pigment print, 40-3/4 x 31-1/4 inches (framed) or 57-3/4 x 43-3/4 inches (framed). Image courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery.

No one else in Nashville but Susan Sherrick would bring Grannan’s photographs of the parched Central Valley, California landscape and its crestfallen but immeasurably gritty inhabitants. You might know Modesto as George Lucas’ hometown or the setting of his 1973 film American Graffiti. Its city slogan is “Water Wealth Contentment Health,” which becomes sadly ironic when you learn that the area gets just 13 inches of rainfall a year, and in 2012, the unemployment rate was 13% while the rest of the U.S. averaged 8.5%. This paradoxical backdrop is Grannan’s landscape. She’s lived in Modesto and got to know her subjects, some of whom she photographed for years. Jerry Saltz said in NY Magazine, “Grannan’s sun-bleached images depict the timeworn American dream of going West and reinventing oneself. Only here the dreams have turned out to be too big, or America too small, or nature too relentless, and they haven’t worked out.” What’s interesting about Grannan’s perspective is that she doesn’t seem to exploit her subjects for their vulnerability the way I feel many photographers do. She creates a subjective gaze that is as telling as it is mythological. Don’t miss this show. And let’s all carry Susan Sherrick around Nashville on our shoulders cause the girl is bringing it.

Channel to Channel: Amanda Brown and KJ Schumacher in “Skins”

If you haven’t been up to Dustin Hedrick’s studio and gallery, this is your chance. Hedrick has a lot going on in the old hosiery mill on Chestnut Street. He hosts a Drink n Draw every Wednesday and will be opening his third show Saturday night. Last month, recent APSU graduate Alexander Wurst sold 6 out of 8 of his paintings in his solo show, and Robert Scobey didn’t fare badly the month before. I feel like between Sherrick and Hedrick, we get exciting contemporary art through completely different means — both are necessary for a vital and progressive art scene. Saturday, Channel to Channel will show work by Amanda Brown and KJ Schumacher. Brown is a Ground Floor Gallery artist whose acrylic crowd paintings are rightfully popular, but this show will feature collage, and I’m looking forward to seeing her work in this medium. She is joined by Schumacher, whose work I liked in “The Artist’s Alphabet,” an exhibition at Ground Floor curated by Jodi Hays just months ago. His tape over photograph work peeks into the city streets of Berlin through photos that are overlapped with brightly colored tape. I love the way his work makes me pay attention to negative space. Channel to Channel is on the second floor of Chestnut Square. Just follow the signs.

Dustin Hedrick installs "Skins," an exhibition of collage work by Amanda Brown and KJ Schumacher.

Dustin Hedrick installs “Skins,” an exhibition of collage work by Amanda Brown and KJ Schumacher, on view Saturday at Channel to Channel. 

Zeitgeist: Bunny Burson “Hidden in Plain Sight” and Patrick DeGuira (with Willie Stewart) “Past Life Memories”

Both Burson and DeGuira use text, Burson more literally in her work inspired by letters found in the attic of her family home written by her Jewish grandparents as they escaped Germany during WWII. “Hidden in Plain Sight” will show her work on mylar, vellum, paper, and aluminum. DeGuira’s work will explore the many selves we all inhabit — the past, the present, and the future. Zeitgeist’s statement on the exhibition includes the following phrases: transferable memories, time jumping, mirroring, re-incarnation. Reason enough to check it out, plus DeGuira is one of Nashville’s best.

WAG: Watkins senior photography students present “in Living,” curated by Christine Rogers

In the arcade, WAG will show senior work from photography students, curated by the very cool Christine Rogers who did List Making Exercises for Nashville earlier this year. “in Living” will include photography by Rebecca Lindley, Upreyl Mitchell, Joe Nunez, Alanna Styer, and Laura Whitfield. I’m continually impressed by Watkins students, and I’m hoping more will stick around after graduation.

Watkins Art Gallery (WAG) shows senior photography students in "in Living."

Watkins Art Gallery (WAG) shows senior photography students in “in Living.”

Those are my faves. There’s plenty more out there, so crawl away!

January Crawl +thank you from NYCnash

For me, 2014 was many things, not all of them good. But launching NYCnash lit the fire under me again as a writer. The blog has engaged me with the arts community in Nashville and has been responsible for me meeting so many funny, wise, talented people. I started NYCnash to help me get out and explore the city. I thought it also might get me writing again. My partner suggested the theme, a New Yorker’s Guide to Nashville, and though it resembles that less and less, it’s gone a long way in helping me feel at home. I’m really grateful that people actually read it, and I’m going to continue writing about what I discover here.

This Saturday I’ll don my long underwear for the first art crawl of the year. I plan to head downtown early to check out COOP Gallery’s exhibition of work from new members. From the press release:

McLean Fahnestock’s inkjet prints from her Rocketless Launch series evoke the shared experience of NASA mission broadcasts and question the future of space travel. Nick Hay’s ‘zine excerpts illustrate and detail an email exchange between a West African doctor and a proclaimed centaur hunter. Angela D. Lee’s photographic prints construct mysterious family histories. Robert Scobey’s plaster sculpture of a My Buddy doll allegorizes progress and tragedy through a lens of childhood imagination.

Print

COOP Gallery will show work from McLean Fahnestock, Nick Hay, Angela D. Lee, and Robert Scobey at Saturday’s art crawl.

Over at WAG, two Watkins juniors show paintings. Marlos E’van describes his show Funkhaus as having“an element of style, grace, violence, disorder and anything bordered. I intend to capture the grace of existence and present it in its elemental nature.” I’m really looking forward to seeing Aaron Harper Space Between Things, “featuring works derived from the experience of walking and driving around the city of Nashville during the night.” That will probably do it for my downtown crawling, although The Arts Company has Michael Weintrobe’s Instrumenthead, which I saw at OZ. It’s worth checking out in person because of the sheer size of the portraits.

amy pleasant

Gallery view of Amy Pleasant’s “re/form” at White Space (Atlanta). Pleasant will show at the Packing Plant January 3.

The Packing Plant has Amy Pleasant who is showing Around and Between, a new body of work that features paintings and a series of cutouts arranged as an archaeological dig. Pleasant’s work is thoughtful, often ambiguous in a way that makes us consider different possibilities. Her exhibition “re/form” at Whitespace (Atlanta) was named one of the best exhibitions in 2014 in BURNAWAY by artist Jiha Moon (see my picks, too). I can never get comfortable in the raw walls and chilly draft at the Packing Plant, which adds a fun element of precariousness to the installations, and curator Ann Catherine Carter has been bringing relevant, complex artists to this pop-up space. Around and Between will also host a closing reception January 8 from 5-8 pm, in case you miss it. Also in Wedgewood/Houston: It’s your last chance to see Greg Pond’s The Place You Will Wait for the Rest of Your Life at Seedspace, but before you go, read these two articles by Joe Nolan and Sara Estes. Louisville’s Dougas Lucas will present a sound installation at Fort Houston, Zeitgeist will have photography by Jeremiah Ariaz and paintings by Lain York, Julia Martin will present new paintings by Harry Underwood, and David Lusk will have Ted Faiers’ paintings and woodcuts. See you there!